Pericoronitis

  • Medical Author:
    Donna S. Bautista, DDS

    Dr. Donna S. Bautista, DDS, completed her undergraduate studies at the University of California, San Diego with a bachelor of arts in biochemistry and cell biology. During her time at UC San Diego, she was involved in basic research including studying processes related to DNA transcription in the field of molecular biology. Upon graduation, she went on to attend dental school at the University of California, San Francisco. In addition to her formal dental training, she provided dental care for underserved communities in the Bay Area through clinics and health fairs. She also worked toward mentoring high school students interested in the field of dentistry.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

What are pericoronitis symptoms and signs?

Signs and symptoms of pericoronitis can range from mild to severe and include pain, swelling of the gums, tenderness, redness of gum tissue, bad breath, bad taste from pus, difficulty opening the jaw, difficulty swallowing, swollen lymph nodes, fever, loss of appetite, and feeling unwell.

What specialists treat pericoronitis?

Any licensed dentist is able to treat pericoronitis. In situations where surgery is required or if it is a severe and complicated case, dental specialists such an oral surgeon or a periodontist (gum surgeon) can provide treatment. In very rare instances, should the infection become more widespread, emergency services with physician care might be needed.

How do health-care professionals diagnose pericoronitis?

Diagnosis of pericoronitis is based on symptoms and appearance during a clinical evaluation with a health-care professional such as a dentist or oral surgeon. A dental X-ray is used to assess the area and rule out other possible causes for pain, such as dental decay. Once all the information from the patient and facts are gathered, the diagnosis of pericoronitis can be made.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/17/2016

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