Peptic Ulcer Disease

  • Medical Author:
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical Editor: Bhupinder Anand, MD
Take the Tummy Trouble Quiz

Quick GuideHealthy Eating Pictures Slideshow: Super Steps to Boost Digestive Health

Healthy Eating Pictures Slideshow: Super Steps to Boost Digestive Health

What are the complications of peptic ulcer?

Patients with ulcers generally function quite comfortably. Some ulcers probably heal even without medications (though they probably recur as well). Therefore, the major problems resulting from ulcers are related to ulcer complications. Complications include bleeding, perforation, and obstruction of emptying of the stomach.

Patients with bleeding ulcers may report passage of black tarry stools (melena), weakness, a sense of passing out upon standing (orthostatic syncope), and vomiting blood (hematemesis). Initial treatment involves rapid replacement of fluids. Patients with persistent or severe bleeding may require blood transfusions. An endoscopy is performed to establish the site of bleeding and to stop active ulcer bleeding with the aid of specialized endoscopic instruments.

Perforation through the stomach leads to the leakage of stomach contents into the abdominal (peritoneal) cavity, resulting in acute peritonitis (infection of the abdominal cavity). These patients report a sudden onset of extreme abdominal pain, which is worsened by any type of motion. Abdominal muscles become rigid and board-like. Urgent surgery usually is required. A duodenal ulcer that has perforated can burrow into adjacent organs such as the pancreas or behind the abdomen and into the back. An esophageal ulcer that perforates can cause severe inflammation of the tissues that surround it (mediastinitis).

If an ulcer occurs in the narrow outlet from the stomach, it can obstruct the flow of stomach contents into the duodenum. Duodenal ulcers sometimes also may obstruct the flow of intestinal contents. Patients with obstruction often report increasing abdominal pain, vomiting of undigested or partially digested food, diminished appetite, and weight loss. The obstruction usually occurs at or near the pylorus of the stomach. Endoscopy is useful in establishing the diagnosis of obstruction from an ulcer and excluding gastric cancer as the cause of the obstruction. In some patients, gastric obstruction can be relieved by suction of the stomach contents with a tube for 72 hours, along with intravenous anti-ulcer medications, such as cimetidine (Tagamet) and ranitidine (Zantac). Patients with persistent obstruction require surgery.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/26/2016
VIEW PATIENT COMMENTS
  • Peptic Ulcer - Symptoms

    What were your symptoms of your peptic ulcer?

    Post View 31 Comments
  • Peptic Ulcer - Treatments

    What kinds of treatments did you receive for your peptic ulcer?

    Post View 4 Comments
  • Peptic Ulcer - Causes

    In your opinion, what was the cause of a peptic ulcer in you, a friend, or relative?

    Post View 3 Comments
  • Peptic Ulcer - Complications

    Did you experience any complications with your peptic ulcer? Please share your story.

    Post View 3 Comments

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors