Parkinson's Disease

  • Medical Author:

    Sietske N. Heyn is a medical writer with a PhD in neuroscience. Dr. Heyn's education includes a BS with honors from the University of Oregon, and a doctoral degree in neuroscience from the University of California at Davis. After completing postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Francisco, and many years of working as a medical writer at the Stanford University Center for Down Syndrome Research, Dr. Heyn now runs her own medical writing business.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

View Parkinson's Disease Slideshow Pictures

Quick GuideParkinson's Disease Pictures Slideshow: Symptoms, Stages and Treatment

Parkinson's Disease Pictures Slideshow: Symptoms, Stages and Treatment

What is the treatment for Parkinson's disease?

There is currently no treatment to cure Parkinson's disease. Several therapies are available to delay the onset of motor symptoms and to ameliorate motor symptoms. All of these therapies are designed to increase the amount of dopamine in the brain either by replacing dopamine, mimicking dopamine, or prolonging the effect of dopamine by inhibiting its breakdown. Studies have shown that early therapy in the non-motor stage can delay the onset of motor symptoms, thereby extending quality of life.

The most effective therapy for Parkinson's disease is levodopa (Sinemet), which is converted to dopamine in the brain. However, because long-term treatment with levodopa can lead to unpleasant side effects (a shortened response to each dose, painful cramps, and involuntary movements), its use is often delayed until motor impairment is more severe. Levodopa is frequently prescribed together with carbidopa (Sinemet), which prevents levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. Co-treatment with carbidopa allows for a lower levodopa dose, thereby reducing side effects.

In earlier stages of Parkinson's disease, substances that mimic the action of dopamine (dopamine agonists), and substances that reduce the breakdown of dopamine (monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors) can be very efficacious in relieving motor symptoms. Unpleasant side effects of these preparations are quite common, including swelling caused by fluid accumulation in body tissues, drowsiness, constipation, dizziness, hallucinations, and nausea.

For some individuals with advanced, virtually unmanageable motor symptoms, surgery may be an option. In deep brain stimulation (DBS), the surgeon implants electrodes to stimulate areas of the brain involved in movement. In another type of surgery, specific areas in the brain that cause Parkinson's symptoms are destroyed.

An alternative approach that has been explored is the use of dopamine-producing cells derived from stem cells. While stem cell therapy has great potential, more research is required before such cells can become of therapeutic value in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

In addition to medication and surgery, general lifestyle changes (rest and exercise), physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy may be beneficial.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/4/2015
VIEW PATIENT COMMENTS
  • Parkinson's Disease - Symptoms

    At what age did Parkinson's symptoms first appear, and what are they?

    Post View 30 Comments
  • Parkinson's Disease - Treatments

    What do you do to treat and manage your Parkinson's disease?

    Post View 11 Comments
  • Parkinson's Disease - Diagnosis

    At what stage was your Parkinson's disease diagnosed?

    Post View 12 Comments
  • Parkinson's Disease - Prognosis

    Parkinson's is not a fatal disease. What is the prognosis for you, a friend, or relative?

    Post View 1 Comment

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors