Pancreatic Cancer

  • Medical Author:
    Francis W. Nugent, MD

    Dr. F.W. Nugent is a medical oncologist specializing in gastrointestinal cancers with a special interest in pancreatic cancer. Dr. Nugent graduated from Middlebury College with a bachelors degree in religion before graduating from Albany Medical College. He presently serves as vice-chairman of medical oncology at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Massachusetts.

  • Medical Author: Keith E. Stuart, MD
    Keith E. Stuart, MD

    Dr. Keith E. Stuart is a medical oncologist specializing in the study and treatment of cancers involving the gastrointestinal tract, with a special interest in tumors involving the liver. He was educated at Harvard University (graduating magna cum laude) and Albert Einstein College of Medicine and did his medical training at the New England Deaconess Hospital.

  • Medical Author: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

  • Medical Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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Quick GuidePancreatic Cancer Pictures Slideshow

Pancreatic Cancer Pictures Slideshow

What is the treatment for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer?

If a pancreatic cancer is found when it has grown into important local structures but not yet spread to distant sites, this is described as locally advanced, unresectable (inoperable) pancreatic cancer (stage III). The standard of care in the United States for the treatment of locally advanced cancer is a combination of low-dose chemotherapy given simultaneously with radiation treatments to the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Radiation treatments are designed to lower the risk of local growth of the cancer, thereby minimizing the symptoms that local progression causes (back or belly pain, nausea, loss of appetite, intestinal blockage, jaundice). Radiation treatments are typically given Monday through Friday for about 5 weeks. Chemotherapy given concurrently (at the same time) may improve the effectiveness of the radiation and may lower the risk for cancer spread outside the area where the radiation is delivered. When the radiation is completed and the patient has recovered, more chemotherapy is often recommended. Recently, newer forms of radiation delivery (stereotactic radiosurgery, gamma knife radiation, cyber knife radiation) have been utilized in locally advanced pancreatic cancer with varying degrees of success, but these treatments can be more toxic and are, for now, largely experimental.

What is the treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer?

Once a pancreatic cancer has spread beyond the vicinity of the pancreas and involves other organs, it has become a problem through the system. As a result, a systemic treatment is most appropriate and chemotherapy (for example, protein-bound paclitaxel [Abraxane] in combination with gemcitabine [Gemzar]) is recommended. Chemotherapy travels through the bloodstream and goes anywhere the blood flows and, as such, treats most of the body. It can attack a cancer that has spread through the body wherever it is found. In metastatic pancreatic cancer, chemotherapy is recommended for individuals well enough to receive it. It has been proven to both extend the lives of patients with pancreatic cancer and to improve their quality of life. These benefits are documented, but unfortunately the overall benefit from chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer treatment is modest and chemotherapy prolongs life for the average patient by only a few months. Chemotherapy options for patients with pancreatic cancer vary from treatment with a single chemotherapy agent to treatment with as many as three chemotherapies given together. The aggressiveness of the treatment is determined by the cancer doctor (medical oncologist) and by the overall health and strength of the individual patient.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/29/2016

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