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oxaliplatin - injection, Eloxatin (cont.)

HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your health care professional before you receive oxaliplatin.This medication is usually given by infusion into a vein over at least 2 hours by a health care professional. It is usually given every 2 weeks along with other medications (e.g., 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin). The dosage is based on your medical condition, body size, and response to therapy.

SIDE EFFECTS: Diarrhea, changes in taste, mouth sores, nosebleeds, tiredness, headache, dizziness, or trouble sleeping may occur. Nausea and vomiting may be severe in some patients. Your doctor may prescribe medication to prevent or relieve nausea and vomiting. Eating several small meals, not eating before treatment, or limiting activity may help lessen some of these effects. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.Temporary hair loss may infrequently occur. Normal hair growth should return after treatment has ended.Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: pain/redness/swelling at the injection site, easy or unusual bruising/bleeding, mental/mood changes (e.g., depression), signs of too much body water loss (e.g., decreased urination, increased thirst, dry mouth), muscle cramps, weakness, pain/redness/swelling of the arms/legs, groin/calf pain, fainting.Oxaliplatin can sometimes affect how your nerves work (peripheral neuropathy). Tell your doctor immediately if you develop: sensitivity to cold, trouble breathing/swallowing/speaking, jaw tightness, strange feeling in your tongue, eye pain, chest pressure, numbness/tingling/"pins and needles" sensation of the hands/feet/mouth/throat.You may lessen these types of nerve problems by avoiding cold drinks and ice and by dressing warmly. Tell your doctor immediately if your nerve problems begin to interfere with your normal daily activities (e.g., walking, writing, eating).Get medical help right away if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: dry cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, black stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, vision changes (such as blurred vision, temporary vision loss), seizures, sudden confusion.This medication can lower your body's ability to fight an infection. Notify your doctor promptly if you develop any signs of an infection such as fever, chills, or persistent sore throat.A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any of the following symptoms of a serious allergic reaction: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/16/2014


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