Making Sense of OTC Cold and Cough Medications

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Unsure about the hundreds of cold and flu preparations on the drugstore shelves? You're not alone. Deciding among the OTC (over-the-counter) remedies for cold, flu, or allergy symptoms can be intimidating, and a basic understanding of the types of drugs contained in these medications can help you make an informed choice.

Decongestants

Decongestants are the drugs of choice for a stuffy, congested nose. Decongestants act by narrowing the blood vessels in the nose, leading to decreased blood flow in the nasal tissues and reduced leakage of fluid from the nose. Decongestants can either be taken orally or applied locally (topically) in the form of nasal sprays or drops.

Pseudoephedrine (for example, loratadine and pseudoephedrine [Claritin-D], Sudafed, fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine [Allegra D]) and phenylephrine are decongestants that can be taken orally. Phenylephrine and oxymetolazone are examples of topical decongestants. While topical decongestants are effective after a few minutes, oral preparations (tablets) can take about 30 minutes to work. Decongestants act as stimulants that can increase heart rate, raise the blood pressure, exacerbate palpitations, and lead to feelings of nervousness or feeling "hyper."

It's important to note that decongestants do not relieve a runny or itchy nose.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines counteract the effects of histamine, a chemical released by the body during allergic reactions. Histamines can cause sneezing, itching of the throat and eyes, and a runny nose. Over-the-counter antihistamines belong to one of two groups: first-generation antihistamines and the newer second-generation antihistamines.

The drugs found in first-generation OTC antihistamines include:

  • brompheniramine,
  • chlorpheniramine (for example, Tannate-12 S, Tannihist-12 RF, Trionate, Tussi-12 S, Tussizone-12 RF, Tussionex)
  • dimenhydrinate,
  • doxylamine, and
  • diphenhydramine (Benadryl).

They generally have an opposite effect from decongestants and can be sedating. Paradoxically, infants and children may sometimes become irritable after taking antihistamines. Common OTC antihistamines take about 30-60 minutes to work. Loratidine (Claritin, Claritin RediTabs, Alavert, and others) is an example of the newer, second-generation antihistamines that is available OTC.

The second-generation antihistamines do not possess the sedating effects of the older, first-generation antihistamines.

OTC Cold and Cough Medications Resources

Read patient comments on Chronic Cough - Treatment

Doctor written main article on Chronic Cough

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/18/2017

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