Oral Gonorrhea Symptoms

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Many people, especially young teens, consider oral sex to be "safe" sex. "Safe sex" by many people is defined as having sexual gratification by means that reduces or eliminates the chance of producing a fetus (pregnancy). However, many people include in the meaning of "safe sex," sex practices that prevent or significantly reduce the possibility of getting a disease from a sex partner (for examples, HIV, chlamydia, syphilis, or gonorrhea). Most doctors do not consider oral (and other) sexual practices "safe" unless precautions are taken to prevent or substantially reduce disease transmission between partners, or if the sex partners are uninfected. Consequently, oral sex (any male or female oral contact with a partner's genitalia; most clinicians also include genital/oral contact with any other body orifice such as the anus or rectum in the definition) is not, without precautions, considered inherently "safe sex" because sexually transmitted diseases (STD's) may be transferred by these practices.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/9/2015