Oleander

How does Oleander work?

Oleander contains chemicals called glycosides, which can affect the heart. These chemicals can slow the heart rate down.

Are there safety concerns?

Injecting a specific oleander product (Anvirzel) into the muscle is POSSIBLY SAFE when administered by a healthcare professional.

Oleander is LIKELY UNSAFE for anyone to take by mouth. It can cause a burning sensation in the mouth, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, headache, stomach pain, serious heart problems, and many other side effects. Taking the oleander leaf, oleander leaf tea, or oleander seeds has led to deadly poisonings.

There isn't enough information to know whether or not it is safe to apply oleander to the skin. It's best not to do this.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

It's LIKELY UNSAFE for anyone to take oleander by mouth. But oleander is especially dangerous for people with the following conditions:

Children: Oleander is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in children. Taking the oleander leaf, oleander leaf tea, or oleander seeds has led to deadly poisonings.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Taking oleander by mouth is LIKELY UNSAFE as it might cause an abortion or cause birth defects. There isn't enough information to know whether or not it is safe for pregnant or breast-feeding women to apply oleander to the skin. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Too little potassium or too much calcium (electrolyte imbalance): Oleander affects the heart. An electrolyte imbalance also affects the heart. It's especially dangerous to use oleander if you have an electrolyte imbalance.

Heart disease: Don't use oleander to treat heart disease without the supervision of a healthcare professional. It's too dangerous to self-medicate.


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