Norovirus Infection

  • Medical Author:
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Quick GuideHealthy Living: 10 Health Myths Debunked

Healthy Living: 10 Health Myths Debunked

What is the incubation period for a norovirus infection? How long are people infected with norovirus contagious?

Norovirus may have a prolonged infection period that starts even before someone gets sick. There is a short lag or incubation period (up to two days) between the time that people acquire the virus and the time they get symptoms. People may be contagious during this period. All people are contagious while they are having symptoms or showing signs.

Although the most contagious period is over when the patient's symptoms resolve, even some people who appear to have recovered completely after a norovirus infection may continue to shed the virus for weeks in their stool and may be a source of infection to others. People with compromised immune systems (for example, those receiving chemotherapy or undergoing organ transplant) may shed the virus for months. However, in general, most individuals become noncontagious about 72 hours after symptoms have resolved. Consequently, although it may be difficult for parents to do so, children and adults should not go back to school, day care, or work until they have been symptom-free for three days. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 10/28/2015
References
REFERENCES:

Glass, R.I., U.D. Parashar, and M.K. Estes. "Norovirus Gastroenteritis." N Engl J Med 361 (2009): 1776-1785.

United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. "Updated Norovirus Outbreak Management and Disease Prevention Guidelines." MMWR Recomm Rep 60.RR-3 (2011): 1-20.

United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Norovirus." Sept. 30, 2015. <http://www.cdc.gov/norovirus/>.

United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Norovirus: NoroSTAT Data." May 29, 2015. <http://www.cdc.gov/norovirus/reporting/norostat/
data.html>.

IMAGES:

1.iStock

2.BurtAlert

3.Getty Images

4.Getty Images

5.iStock

6.iStock

7.BigStock

8.BurtAlert

9.Getty Images

10.iStock

11.iStock

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Newsletters

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

VIEW PATIENT COMMENTS
  • Norovirus Infection - Symptoms

    What were the symptoms associated with a norovirus infection in you or someone you know?

    Post View 63 Comments
  • Norovirus Infection - Treatment

    What was the treatment, including home care, for your norovirus infection?

    Post View 7 Comments

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors