Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs(NSAIDS) and Ulcers

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Bleeding Ulcer Symptoms and Causes

It started with feeling a little run down after working extra hard, perhaps there was some lightheadedness when he stood too quickly, and then came the fatigue. The baseball world blamed Ichiro Suzuki's malaise on playing too much in the World Baseball Classic. During spring training, baseball players are supposed to lounge and gradually get themselves into shape, not play like it's the World Series in October. But the baseball world was wrong. It was discovered in April 2009 that Ichiro was tired because he was anemic and because he was bleeding from an ulcer.

What are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)?

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed medications for the inflammation of arthritis and other body tissues, such as in tendinitis and bursitis. The also are used for minor aches and pains.

Examples of NSAIDs include:

NSAIDs are available by prescription or without a prescription (over-the-counter). They also are ingredients in many over the counter medications used for colds and minor aches and pain. They are administered orally as capsules, tablets, liquids, or by injection (ketorolac , Toradol). Although not included in this review, NSAIDs also are used as eye drops for eye inflammation (for example, ketorolac tromethamine [Acular]).

NSAIDs are taken regularly by approximately 33 million Americans and over 30 billion doses of NSAIDs are consumed annually in the United States.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/17/2016

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