nizatidine, Axid, Axid AR

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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Serious but rare side effects include anemia, and a reduction in white blood cells or platelets. Hepatitis also has been reported.

PRESCRIPTION: Yes, 150 mg, 300 mg and solution: no, 75 mg

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS:

  • Prescription tablets: 75 mg;
  • Prescription capsule: 150 and 300 mg;
  • Prescription solution: 15 mg/ml.
  • Nonprescription tablets; 75 mg.

STORAGE: Nizatidine should be stored at room temperature, between 15 C and 30 C (59 F and 86 F) in a tightly closed container.

DOSING:

  • Treatment of ulcers: The usual adult dose for treatment of ulcers (duodenal or gastric) is 300 mg daily administered once at bedtime or 150 mg twice daily. Most duodenal ulcers heal after 4 weeks of treatment.
  • Preventing ulcer recurrence and GERD: A dose of 150 mg at bedtime is used for preventing ulcer recurrence, and GERD is treated with 150 mg twice daily or 300 mg once daily.
  • Heartburn prevention: The recommended dose for prevention of heartburn is 75 mg administered 30-60 minutes before meals or beverages.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Nizatidine, like other drugs that reduce stomach acid, may interfere with the absorption of drugs that require acid for adequate absorption. Examples include iron salts (for example iron sulphate), itraconazole (Sporanox), and ketoconazole (Nizoral, Extina, Xolegel, Kuric), atazanavir (Reyataz), dasatinib (Sprycel), indinavir (Crixivan), and dapsone. Conversely, it may increase levels of nimodipine (Nimotop) and nisoldipine (Sular) due to reduced stomach acidity.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/22/2015

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