Patient Comments: Necrotizing Fasciitis - Experience

Please describe your experience with necrotizing fasciitis.

A Doctor's View on Flesh Eating Bacterial Infection

Read the Comment by Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

"Flesh-eating bacteria" or necrotizing fasciitis is a very rare, but serious bacterial infection. Necrotizing fasciitis infection begins just below the skin and spreads to different tissues. Necrotizing fasciitis is known as the "flesh-eating bacteria" because the infection produces toxins that destroy muscles and tissue like fat and skin. Read the entire Doctor's View

Comment from: where he became infected. He didn"t have cuts or o, Male (Caregiver) Published: August 04

My brother entered the hospital on November 15, 2013 after originally being seen in the emergency room (ER) 5 days earlier for sciatica in his left thigh. His leg swelled severely and he was rushed into surgery when he returned to the ER. A second surgery the next evening revealed the necrotizing fasciitis had spread to his left gluteal area and also had begun to enter the lower spinal canal. A lot of tissue was removed from both his leg and buttocks and he was receiving large doses of antibiotics. Showing signs of extraordinary improvement, including standing and walking in place, we were hopeful for a prolonged, but definite recovery. Unfortunately, the infection had reached his brain cavity and he died on Christmas Eve. Doctors said it was from sepsis and Klebsiella. To this day we have no idea just how

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Necrotizing Fasciitis - Cause Question: What was the cause of your necrotizing fasciitis?
Necrotizing Fasciitis - Treatments Question: What was the treatment for your necrotizing fasciitis?
Necrotizing Fasciitis - Signs and Symptoms Question: What were the signs and symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis in you or someone you know?
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