MRSA

  • Medical Author:

    Sandra Gonzalez Gompf, MD, FACP is a U.S. board-certified Infectious Disease subspecialist. Dr. Gompf received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Miami, and a Medical Degree from the University of South Florida. Dr. Gompf completed residency training in Internal Medicine at the University of South Florida followed by subspecialty fellowship training there in Infectious Diseases under the directorship of Dr. John T. Sinnott, IV.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Quick GuideMRSA Infection: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

MRSA Infection: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

What types of doctors treat MRSA infections?

Since MRSA can affect any organ, different doctors may be involved in caring for someone with MRSA. Most surgeons and primary-care doctors, such as family practice specialists, pediatricians, internists, and emergency-care doctors, can treat MRSA infections. Complicated or deep MRSA infections are often treated by an infectious-diseases specialist who is consulted by another doctor. A pulmonologist (lung specialist) may help to treat patients with MRSA pneumonia. A cardiologist (heart specialist) may help to diagnose MRSA infection of the heart valves. Specialist surgeons may be needed to treat deep MRSA infections in different parts of the body, such as an orthopedist (bone surgeon), podiatrist (foot surgeon), vascular (blood vessel surgeon), or cardiovascular (heart) surgeons.

How should caregivers treat MRSA patients at home?

The CDC states that healthy caregivers are unlikely to become infected while caring for MRSA patients at home. Patients with MRSA and their caregivers should do the following:

  • Clean hands often, especially before and after changing wound dressings or bandages.
  • Keep any wounds clean and change bandages as instructed until healed.
  • Avoid sharing personal items such as towels or razors.
  • Wash and dry clothes and bed linens with detergent and the temperatures recommended on the labels. Cold water is adequate to remove germs if an item cannot be washed warm.
  • Tell health-care providers that the person has MRSA. This includes home health nurses and aides, therapists, and personnel in doctors' offices.
  • Follow all other instructions given by the doctor. Continue Reading
Reviewed on 5/4/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Baorto, Elizabeth P. "Staphylococcus aureus Infections.: Medscape.com. Apr. 27, 2016. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/971358-overview>.

Herchline, Thomas E. "Staphylococcal Infections." Medscape.com. Apr. 25, 2016. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/228816-overview>.

Kallen, A.J., S. Bulens, A. Reingold, et al. "Health Care-Associated Invasive MRSA Infections, 2005-2008." JAMA 304 (2010): 641-648.

IMAGES:

1. CDC - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

2. CDC - James Gathany

3. CDC

4. MedicineNet

5. iStock

6. Getty Images

7. iStock

8. MedicineNet

9. iStock

10. Getty Images

11. iStock

12. iStock

13. iStock

14. iStock

15. CDC/MedicineNet

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