Mitral Valve Prolapse
(MVP)

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Mitral valve prolapse facts

  • Mitral valve prolapse (mitral valve prolapse) is the most common heart valve abnormality.
  • Most patients with mitral valve prolapse have no symptoms and require no treatment.
  • Mitral valve prolapse can be associated with fatigue and/or palpitations.
  • Mitral valve prolapse can often be detected by a doctor during examination of the heart. mitral valve prolapse can be confirmed with an echocardiogram.
  • Patients with mitral valve prolapse are usually given antibiotics prior to any procedure which might introduce bacteria into the bloodstream, including dental work and minor surgery.

What is mitral valve prolapse?

Mitral valve prolapse (also known as "click murmur syndrome" and "Barlow's syndrome") is the most common heart valve abnormality, affecting 5% to 10% of the world population; the condition is slightly more prevalent in women than in men. The mitral valve is one of the four heart valves. A normal mitral valve consists of two thin leaflets, located between the left atrium and the left ventricle of the heart. Mitral valve leaflets, shaped like parachutes, are attached to the inner wall of the left ventricle by a series of strings called "chordae." When the ventricles contract, the mitral valve leaflets close snugly and prevent the backflow of blood from the left ventricle into the left atrium. When the ventricles relax, the valves open to allow oxygenated blood from the lungs to fill the left ventricle.

In patients with mitral valve prolapse, the mitral apparatus (valve leaflets and chordae) becomes affected by a process called myxomatous degeneration. In myxomatous degeneration, the structural protein collagen forms abnormally and causes thickening, enlargement, and redundancy of the leaflets and chordae. Blood normally flows through the mitral valve from the left upper chamber (left atrium) to the left lower chamber (left ventricle) of the heart. When the ventricles contract, the redundant leaflets prolapse (flop backwards) into the left atrium, sometimes allowing leakage of blood through the valve opening (mitral regurgitation) back into the left atrium. When severe, mitral regurgitation can lead to heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms. Most patients are totally unaware of the prolapsing of the mitral valve. Others may experience a number of symptoms discussed below.

The mitral valve prolapse (MVP) syndrome has a strong hereditary tendency, although the exact cause is unknown. Affected family members are often tall, thin, with long arms and fingers, and straight backs. It is seen most commonly in women from 20 to 40 years old, but also occurs in men.

Heart and valves illustration.
Heart and valves illustration.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/23/2013

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Mitral Valve Prolapse Signs and Symptoms

Most people who have mitral valve prolapse (MVP) aren't affected by the condition. They don't have any symptoms or major mitral valve backflow.

When MVP does cause signs and symptoms, they may include:

  • Palpitations (feelings that your heart is skipping a beat, fluttering, or beating too hard or too fast)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cough
  • Fatigue (tiredness), dizziness, or anxiety
  • Migraine headaches
  • Chest discomfort

MVP symptoms can vary from one person to another. They tend to be mild but can worsen over time, mainly when complications occur.

SOURCE:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


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