miconazole, Monistat, M-Zole, Micatin

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

What is the dosage for miconazole?

Miconazole vaginal cream and suppositories are for use only in the vagina. These products are not to be taken by mouth. The vaginal suppositories are inserted, one per dose, in an applicator. Alternatively, the tube containing the vaginal cream is screwed onto the end of a special applicator tube, and the tube is then squeezed to fill the applicator. The patient then lies on her back with bent knees, inserts the applicator containing either the suppository or cream so that the tip of the applicator is high in the vagina, and then pushes the plunger in to deposit the suppository or cream into the vagina. The applicator should be washed with warm soap and water after each use.

Miconazole usually is used once daily at bedtime. The 200 mg suppositories (Monistat 3) are inserted once nightly for 3 nights. The 100 mg suppositories (Monistat-7) and intravaginal cream are inserted once nightly for 7 nights. The 1200 mg formulation (Monistat 1) is applied once for one night.

For fungal skin infections, the topical cream is applied as a thin layer to cover the affected skin and surrounding area, usually once or twice daily for 2-4 weeks. The hands should be washed before and after application.

Which drugs or supplements interact with miconazole?

There are no known drug interactions with vaginal or topical miconazole.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/11/2017
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