metolazone, Zaroxolyn, Diulo (Discontinued); Mykrox (Discontinued) (cont.)

Pharmacy Author:
Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

About 1 out of every 10 patients report dizziness, lightheadedness, and headache. Fatigue has been reported in 1 out of every 25 patients. About 1 out of every 50 patients reports:

Thiazide diuretics, which are chemically related to metolazone, are known to increase the amount of uric acid in the blood. Precipitation of gout (which is associated with high uric acid) is rare. Metolazone can increase blood sugar in people with diabetes.

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 2.5, 5, and 10 mg.

STORAGE: Tablets should be stored at room temperature, 15 C - 30 C (59 F - 86 F).

DOSING: The recommended dose is 2.5 to 5 mg for hypertension and 2.5-20 mg for treating edema.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Metolazone can reduce blood potassium and magnesium levels. This is especially true in patients who also are taking "loop" diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix), bumetanide (Bumex), and torsemide (Demadex ). Low potassium and magnesium levels can lead to heart rhythm abnormalities, especially in patients taking digoxin (Lanoxin). Metolazone reduces excretion of lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith) by the kidneys and can lead to lithium toxicity in patients receiving lithium. Steroids (for example, hydrocortisone) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn), and nabumetone (Relafen) can reduce the effectiveness of metolazone by interfering with the excretion of salt and water.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/3/2015


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