metoclopramide, Reglan, Metozolv ODT, (Reglan ODT, Octamide, and Maxolon (cont.)

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In some patients, particularly those with diabetes, damage to nerves in the stomach can interfere with function of the muscles and cause delayed emptying of the stomach, resulting in nausea, vomiting, a sense of abdominal fullness and distention, and heartburn (diabetic gastroparesis). Metoclopramide can be effective in relieving the symptoms related to diabetic gastroparesis by stimulating more rapid emptying of the stomach as well as decreasing the reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus. Dopamine receptors on nerves in the brain are important in producing nausea. Metoclopramide interacts with the dopamine receptors in the brain and can be effective in treating nausea. The FDA approved metoclopramide in June 1985.

PRESCRIBED FOR: Metoclopramide is used on a short term basis (4 to 12 weeks) for treating patients with heartburn and esophagitis due to GERD and for treating patients who have gastroparesis. Metoclopramide is used to promote emptying of the stomach prior to radiological examinations and to facilitate passage of tubes passed through the nose or mouth and into the small intestine. It is used for treating impaired function of muscles of the small intestine that may give rise to symptoms that mimic intestinal obstruction (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distention). Metoclopramide also is used in the treatment of nausea due to surgery or cancer chemotherapy.

SIDE EFFECTS: Metoclopramide is generally well-tolerated when used in low doses for brief periods. Neurological side effects increase with higher doses and longer periods of treatment. Common side effects of metoclopramide are:

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/2/2015

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