Men's Health

  • Medical Author:
    Benjamin Wedro, MD, FACEP, FAAEM

    Dr. Ben Wedro practices emergency medicine at Gundersen Clinic, a regional trauma center in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His background includes undergraduate and medical studies at the University of Alberta, a Family Practice internship at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

  • Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Quick GuideScreening Tests Every Man Should Have

Screening Tests Every Man Should Have

9. Kidney disease

The kidneys filter impurities from the blood and dispose of them in the urine. They are also important in maintaining electrolyte balance in the blood. Even in healthy people, aging gradually decreases the efficiency of kidney function. Kidney failure is often a result of years of poorly controlled high blood pressure and diabetes.

In the United States, approximately 26 million people have chronic kidney disease.

10. Alzheimer's disease

Dementia and Alzheimer's disease describes a gradual loss of cognition and intellectual ability including language, attention, memory, and problem solving is an otherwise healthy person. The cause is unknown and there is no cure. Recommendations to decrease the risk of dementia include avoiding smoking, and keeping blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes under control. Physical and mental fitness may help prevent dementia; keeping socially active may also help. Recurrent head injuries are associated with dementia. Alzheimer's disease and dementia are not direct causes of death, but they make it more difficult to identify and treat complications that can lead to death.

The checklist: How to stay healthy

Being proactive about your health is an important starting point in maintaining health. Some steps are self-evident but a person may need help in taking the first step. The ability to recognize that living healthy is a life-long commitment is an important key to longevity. Nobody is perfect, and the ultimate goal is to have more good habits than bad. Failing to meet a goal does not give permission to quit trying. Doing well one day is not a license to stray the next.

Here is a checklist to promote a healthier lifestyle and living a longer, healthier life.

  • Stop smoking
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Engage in some type of physical activity every day
  • Eat a heart healthy diet
  • Maintain good control of blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes
  • Get routine medical care and physical examinations
  • Get recommended screenings for prostate and colon cancer
  • Perform routine home testicle exams
  • Keep mentally active
  • Maintain close relationships with a circle of friends
  • Seek help if you have symptoms of depression

Medically reviewed by Avrom Simon, MD; Board Certified Preventative Medicine with Subspecialty in Occupational Medicine

REFERENCES:

CDC.gov. Leading Causes of Death in Males United States, 2006.
<http://www.cdc.gov/men/lcod/index.htm>

CDC.gov. Pneumococcal Disease In-Short.
<http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/pneumo/in-short-both.htm>

CDC.gov. Life expectancy at birth, at 65 years of age, and at 75 years of age, by race and sex: United States, selected years 1900-2007.
<http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus2009tables/Table024.pdf>

CDC.gov. Lung Cancer Risk Factors.
<http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm>

National Kidney Foundation.org. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD).
<http://www.kidney.org/kidneydisease/ckd/index.cfm>

Sun Tzu. (n.d.). Great-Quotes.com. Retrieved December 12, 2011, from Great-Quotes.com Web site.
<http://www.great-quotes.com/quote/964523>

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/17/2016

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