meclofenamate; Meclomen

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

What is meclofenamate, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Meclofenamate belongs to a class of drugs called

Is meclofenamate available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

Do I need a prescription for meclofenamate?

Yes

What are the uses for meclofenamate?

Meclofenamate is used for the relief of mild to moderate pain. It also is used to treat dysmenorrhea (painful periods), idiopathic heavy menstrual blood loss, and relief of the signs and symptoms of acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Off label uses include ankylosing spondylitis (arthritis that mainly affects the spine) and vascular headache.

What are the side effects of meclofenamate?

The most common side effects are:

It is important to note that people who take NSAIDs such as meclofenamate may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or a stroke than people who do not take these medications. Meclofenamate may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. The risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a longer period of time, are older in age, have poor health, or drink large amounts of alcohol.

If patients experience any of the following symptoms they should stop taking meclofenamate and call their doctor:

nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used to treat pain and inflammation. Other NSAIDS include:

(Relafen) and several others. These drugs are used for the management of mild to moderate pain, fever, and inflammation. They work by reducing the levels of prostaglandins, chemicals that are responsible for pain, fever, and inflammation. Meclofenamate blocks the enzymes that make prostaglandins (cyclooxygenases), resulting in lower concentrations of prostaglandins. As a consequence, inflammation, pain, and fever are reduced. Meclofenamate was approved by the FDA in June 1980.

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What is the dosage for meclofenamate?

The usual dose for mild to moderate pain is 50 to 100 mg every 4 to 6 hours.

For excessive menstrual blood loss and primary dysmenorrhea the usual dose is 100 mg three times a day, for up to six days. The maximum dose is 300 mg daily.

For rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis the usual dose is 50 to 100 mg 3 to 4 times a day. The maximum dose is 400 mg daily..

Which drugs or supplements interact with meclofenamate?

: Concurrent use of meclofenamate and warfarin (Coumadin), a blood thinner, may cause excessive bleeding as meclofenamate enhances the effect of warfarin. It is important, therefore, to reduce the dosage of warfarin.

Meclofenamate, as other NSAIDS may reduce the effects of blood pressure-lowering medications. This may occur because prostaglandins are important in the regulation of blood pressure.

Concurrent use of meclofenamate and cyclosporine (Sandimmune), an immunosuppressant, can increase the risk of kidney damage (nephrotoxicity), as meclofenamate tends to increase cyclosporine-induced kidney damage by blocking certain prostaglandins that are important in preventing toxic effects on the kidney. It is important, therefore, to avoid this combination and/or monitor kidney function and blood pressure.

Persons who have more than three alcoholic beverages per day may be at increased risk of developing stomach ulcers when taking meclofenamate or other NSAIDs.

What else should I know about meclofenamate?

What preparations of meclofenamate are available?

Capsules: 50 and 100 mg.

How should I keep meclofenamate stored?

Meclofenamate should be stored at 20 C to 25 C (68 F to 77 F) in a sealed container protected from light and moisture.

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Last Editorial Review: 1/5/2016

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Reviewed on 1/5/2016
References
Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

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