Measles (Rubeola)

  • Medical Author:

    Dr. Eddie Hooker is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is also an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville and at Wright State University. His areas of expertise include emergency medicine, epidemiology, health-services management, and public health.

  • Medical Author: Mary K. Bister, MD
  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Childhood Illnesses Every Parent Should Know

Measles Symptoms and Signs

Measles, also known as rubeola, is a respiratory disease characterized by a rash all over the body in addition to fever, runny nose, and cough. It is typically a childhood illness that can be complicated by ear infection or pneumonia; associated symptoms for these conditions can include

  • ear pain or fullness,
  • shortness of breath,
  • and chest pain.

Measles facts

  • Measles is a potentially serious disease that is caused by a virus that is easily spread.
  • Measles symptoms and signs include
  • Many patients will get sick seven to 14 days after being exposed and will start with a prodrome of fatigue, fever, loss of appetite, and malaise before the classic symptoms develop.
  • Measles can be complicated by ear infections, pneumonia, or encephalitis.
  • Measles infection of the brain (encephalitis) can cause convulsions, mental retardation, and even death.
  • There have been recent epidemics of measles in Europe and increasing outbreaks in the United States.
  • Measles in pregnant women can cause miscarriages or premature delivery.
  • Measles can be prevented through vaccination.
  • Each person not immunized against measles is at risk for measles and puts others at risk. In fact, not being properly immunized is the major risk factor for the disease.

What is measles? What does measles look like?

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease that can be fatal. In most people, the disease produces fever (temperature > 101 F [38.3 C]), a generalized rash that lasts greater than three days, cough, runny nose (coryza), and red eyes (conjunctivitis). The complications of measles that result in most deaths include pneumonia and inflammation of the brain (encephalitis).

Picture of a child with measles skin rash
Picture of a baby with measles. Source: CDC
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/12/2016

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