Magnesium

How does Magnesium work?

Magnesium is required for the proper growth and maintenance of bones. Magnesium is also required for the proper function of nerves, muscles, and many other parts of the body. In the stomach, magnesium helps neutralize stomach acid and moves stools through the intestine.

Are there safety concerns?

Magnesium is safe for most people when taken by mouth or when the prescription-only, injectable product is used correctly. In some people, magnesium might cause stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and other side effects.

Doses less than 350 mg per day are safe for most adults. When taken in very large amounts, magnesium might be unsafe. Large doses might cause too much magnesium to build up in the body causing serious side effects including an irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, confusion, slowed breathing, coma, and death.

Magnesium is safe for pregnant or breast-feeding women when taken by mouth in the amounts recommended. These amounts depend on the age of the woman. Check with your healthcare professional to find out what amounts are right for you.

Do not take magnesium if:
  • You have a heart problem called "heart block."
  • You have kidney problems such as kidney failure.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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