Macular Degeneration

  • Medical Author:
    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, FACS

    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, is a board-certified ophthalmologist. Dr. Dahl's educational background includes a BA with Honors and Distinction from Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, and an MD from Cornell University, where he was selected for Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society. He had an internal medical internship at the New York Hospital/Cornell Medical Center.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

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What is macular degeneration?

Macular degeneration is a common, painless eye condition in which the central portion of the retina deteriorates and does not function adequately.

What is the retina?

The retina is the light sensitive tissue located in the back of the eye. It is like the film in a camera, recording the images we see and sending them via the optic nerve from the eye to the brain. The retina instantly converts light images into electrical impulses through a chemical reaction. The retina then sends these impulses or signal, to the brain, where we interpret what we see, process the visual information, and relate what we see to the rest of our environment.

What is the macula?

The macula is a small portion of the retina located in the central portion of the retina. The macula is responsible for central vision (straight-ahead vision) and provides the ability to see fine detail in your direct line of sight. We use the macula of each eye to have the clear vision that allows us to read, drive a car, and recognize faces or colors. The non-macular areas of the retina provide us with our side vision and best night vision.

What is age-related macular degeneration (AMD)?

Although there are many types of macular degeneration, age-related macular degeneration (AMD or ARMD) is by far the most common type. AMD is a disease associated with aging that gradually destroys sharp central vision that is needed for seeing objects clearly and for common daily tasks such as reading and driving. In some cases, AMD advances so slowly that people notice little change in their vision. In others, the disease progresses faster and may lead to a loss of vision in both eyes. AMD is the leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 years of age and older. AMD usually affects both eyes, although the clinical appearance and degree of visual loss may vary a great deal between the two eyes.

AMD occurs in two forms. "Wet" age-related macular degeneration is less common but more aggressive in its progression to severe central vision loss. "Dry" age-related macular degeneration is the more common type and is more slowly progressive in causing visual loss..

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/7/2015
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  • Macular Degeneration - Age

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  • Macular Degeneration - Risk Factors

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  • Macular Degeneration - Treatment for Wet Macular Degeneration

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