lithium, Lithobid (cont.)

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Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, (for example, hydrochlorothiazide [Hydrodiuril], spironolactone [Aldactone], triamterene [Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide]), can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, (for example, acetazolamide [Diamox]), are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood.

ACE inhibitors, (for example, enalapril [Vasotec], lisinopril [Zestril, Prinivil], benazepril [Lotensin], quinapril [Accupril], moexipril [Univasc], captopril [Capoten], ramipril [Altace]), may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed into the body in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium.

When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, (for example, fluoxetine [Prozac] sertraline [Zoloft], and paroxetine [Paxil], fluvoxamine [Luvox], amitriptyline [Elavil], imipramine [Tofranil], desipramine [Norpramin]). Combining lithium with monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) class of antidepressants (for example, isocarboxazid [Marplan], phenelzine [Nardil], tranylcypromine [Parnate], selegiline [Eldepryl], and procarbazine [Matulane]) or other drugs that inhibit monoamine oxidase (for example, linezolid [Zyvox]) may lead to serious reactions.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/24/2015


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