liothyronine sodium, Cytomel, Triostat

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

View the Hyperthyroidism Slideshow Pictures

Women also may experience irregular menstrual cycles.

Since thyroid hormone affects heart rate and metabolism, the impact of treatment of thyroid hormone on the control of diseases such as atrial fibrillation, diabetes and high cholesterol levels always should be considered.

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 5, 25, and 50 mcg. Injection: 10 mcg/ml

STORAGE: Tablets should be stored at room temperature 20 C - 25 C (68 F - 77 F) and the injectable preparation between 2 C - 8 C (36 F - 46 F )

DOSING: The usual starting dose of liothyronine for treating hypothyroidism is 5 to 25 mcg per day. The dose then is adjusted based on the patient's response and the blood levels of thyroid hormone. Optimal liothyronine doses are different for each patient and vary depending on the patient's age, weight, symptoms, blood levels of thyroid hormone and underlying conditions such as heart disease. Individuals who are hypothyroid will require thyroid hormone for life.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Thyroid hormone affects the body's handling of many drugs. Generally, hypothyroidism (decreased concentration of thyroid hormone) reduces the effects of the body on drugs (metabolism of drugs) while hyperthyroidism (increased concentration of thyroid hormone) increases the effects. Therefore, individuals who are hypothyroid will eliminate drugs more slowly, and those with hyperthyroidism will eliminate drugs faster compared with individuals with normal levels of thyroid hormone.

This principle also applies to the metabolism of drugs that must be metabolized (changed) by the body into their active forms in order to have an effect. Therefore, liothyronine and other thyroid hormones may change the action of many drugs. The elimination of theophylline (Theo-Dur) and similar drugs increases as the dose of thyroid hormone increases. Individuals who are hypothyroid have slower theophylline elimination. Therefore, when the concentration of thyroid hormone is returned to normal with liothyronine, the elimination of theophylline is increased. This reduces the concentration of theophylline in the body and can reduce the effectiveness of theophylline. Patients who are treated for thyroid conditions and who are taking theophylline should have their blood concentration of theophylline monitored, and doses of theophylline should be adjusted as necessary.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/28/2015
Thyroid Quiz: Test Your Medical IQ
FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

RxList Logo

Need help identifying pills and medications?

Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Newsletters

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors