lincomycin (hydrochloride; Lincocin)

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GENERIC NAME: Lincomycin hydrochloride

BRAND NAME: Lincocin

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Lincomycin is an injectable man-made antibiotic. Lincomycin kills bacteria by interfering with the ability of bacteria to produce important proteins necessary for them to survive. Lincomycin is effective against many types of bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Propionibacterium acnes, and others. The FDA approved lincomycin in December 1964.

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: No

PREPARATIONS: Lincomycin is available in 300mg/ml sterile, injection form. It is available in 2 ml and 10 ml vials used for intramuscular and intravenous administration.

STORAGE: Store lincomycin at room temperature between 20 C to 25 C (68 F to 77 F).

PRESCRIBED FOR: Lincomycin is used for treating serious bacterial infections caused by susceptible strains of streptococci, pneumococci, and staphylococci. Use of lincomycin is reserved for penicillin-allergic patients or when penicillin-based treatment is not appropriate. This antibiotic should only be used to treat serious infections because of rare but sometimes fatal intestinal problems have occurred (pseudomembranous colitis).

DOSING:

Intramuscular

  • Adults: Inject 600 mg every 24 hours. May use 600 mg every 12 hours or more often for severe infections, if needed.
  • Pediatric patients of 1 month of age and older: Inject 10 mg/kg every 24 hours. May use 10 mg/kg every 12 hours or more often for severe infections, if needed.

IV

  • Adults: Administer 600 mg to 1000 mg every 8 to 12 hours. May increase doses for more severe infections, but the maximum daily dose of 8000 mg of lincomycin is recommended; higher rates and doses have been associated with severe cardiopulmonary reactions.
  • Pediatric patients of 1 month of age and older: Administer 10 to 20 mg/kg/day in divided doses over 8 to 12 hours.

Safe and effective use of lincomycin is not established for infants of age less than 1 month old.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Lincomycin should be used with caution with neuromuscular blocking medications such as atracurium (Tracrium), pancuronium (Pavulon), rocuronium (Zemuron), succinylcholine (Anectine), and vecuronium. Lincomycin may increase the effects of neuromuscular blockage and lead to respiratory depression.

PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies done on lincomycin to determine safe and effective use in pregnant women.

NURSING MOTHERS: Lincomycin may be excreted in small amounts in breast milk. Therefore, caution should be exercised before using it in nursing mothers. To avoid the potential harm to nursing infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue drug or discontinue nursing before using in nursing mothers.

SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of lincomycin are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, rash, and itching.

Like other antibiotics lincomycin can alter the normal bacteria in the colon and encourage overgrowth of some bacteria such as Clostridium difficile which causes inflammation of the colon (pseudomembranous colitis). Patients who develop signs of pseudomembranous colitis after treatment with lincomycin (diarrhea, fever, abdominal pain, and possibly shock) should contact their physician immediately.

REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/27/2014



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