Latex Allergy

  • Medical Author:
    Allison Ramsey, MD

    Dr. Allison Ramsey earned her undergraduate degree at Colgate University and her medical degree at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. She completed her internal medicine training at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and remained at the university to complete her fellowship training in allergy and clinical immunology. Dr. Ramsey is board certified in internal medicine and allergy and immunology. Her professional interests include the treatment of drug allergy and eosinophilic disorders. She also enjoys teaching medical trainees. She is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, the New York State Allergy Society, and the Finger Lakes Allergy Society. In her personal life, her interests include exercise, especially running and horseback riding; and spending time with her husband and two children.

  • Medical Author: Syed Shahzad Mustafa, MD
    Syed Shahzad Mustafa, MD

    After growing up in the Rochester area, Dr. Mustafa pursued his undergraduate studies at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and attended medical school at SUNY Buffalo. He then completed his internal medicine training at the University of Colorado and stayed in Denver to complete his fellowship training in allergy and clinical immunology at the University of Colorado, National Jewish Health, and Children's Hospital of Denver.

  • Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

What is the treatment for a latex allergy?

Strict avoidance of latex is the treatment for latex allergy. Latex-free synthetic rubber, such as neoprene, nitrile, SBR, Butyl, and Vitron are polymers available as alternatives to natural rubber. Certain individuals at risk for anaphylaxis may benefit from having an epinephrine autoinjector on hand at all times.

No current treatment is available to desensitize a person who is allergic to latex. For a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to latex, topical or oral steroids may be used to treat the rash. An anaphylactic reaction to latex should be treated promptly with injectable epinephrine, and mild reactions confined to the skin may be treated with oral antihistamines.

Latex-containing products (partial list)

  • Band-Aids
  • Rubber bands
  • Erasers
  • Some shoes and articles of clothing
  • Balloons
  • Surgical gloves
  • Catheters
  • Condoms
  • Some items of sporting equipment
  • Blood pressure cuffs
  • Some watch bands
  • Helmets
  • Toothbrush massagers
  • Bowling balls
  • Ventilator tubing.

REFERENCE:

"Latex allergy: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis"
UpToDate.com

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/29/2016

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