Knee Injury

  • Medical Author:
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

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Arthroscopy and Knee Injuries

Common joint injuries for which arthroscopy is considered include cartilage tears (meniscus tears), ligament strains and tears, and cartilage deterioration underneath the kneecap (patella). Arthroscopy is commonly used in the evaluation of knees and shoulders but can also be used to examine and treat conditions of the wrist, ankles, and elbows.

Knee injury facts

  • The knee is one of the most common body parts to be injured.
  • Types of knee injuries include sprains, strains, bursitis, dislocations, fractures, meniscus tears, and overuse injuries.
  • Knee injuries are generally caused by twisting or bending force applied to the knee, or a direct blow, such as from sports, falls, or accidents.
  • Risk factors for knee injury include overuse, improper training, having osteoporosis, and playing high-impact sports that involve sudden changes in direction.
  • The main signs and symptoms of knee injury are pain and swelling.
  • Knee injuries are diagnosed by a history and physical. Sometimes an X-ray or MRI may be done.
  • Treatment of knee injuries depends on the type and severity of the injury and can involve RICE therapy (rest, ice, compression, elevation), physical therapy, immobilization, or surgery.
  • Prognosis for knee injury depends on the type and severity of the injury and the need for physical therapy or surgery.
  • Knee injuries can be prevented by proper training, proper equipment, and maintaining a safe playing field or home environment to avoid falls.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/21/2015

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