Adenovirus 14 Infection (Killer Cold Virus)

  • Medical Author:
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

  • Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

Is Adenovirus 14 contagious?

Yes, Ad14 is contagious person to person. Usually, an individual becomes infected with Ad14 through person-to-person exposure via droplets containing Ad14 expelled by an infected person who coughs or sneezes. When these droplets reach the eyes, nose, or mouth, the Ad14 virus can attach and infect cells. These infected sites allow the virus to proliferate in some patients, and the virus then may go on to infect other organ systems, especially the lungs.

How is Adenovirus 14 transmitted?

The virus is usually transmitted by droplets produced by coughing or sneezing. Ad14 also can be passed through direct hand-to-hand contact if an infected patient has not washed their hands after coughing or sneezing. Adenoviruses can survive for days on objects like doorknobs, hand rails, and other objects. If a non-infected person touches the contaminated item, they can pick up the virus and then transfer it to a site (mouth, nose, eyes) where the virus can infect cells and proliferate.

What are risk factors for an Adenovirus 14 infection?

Risk factors include crowded living conditions like schools, day care facilities, dorms or barracks, lack of hand-washing, utilization of public transit, and close association with an infected individual. Immunosuppressed people may be at increased risk.

What is the incubation period for an Adenovirus 14 infection?

The incubation period (time from infection to showing symptoms) is variable and ranges from about two days to two weeks with about a five- to eight-day average.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/10/2017

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