Khella

How does Khella work?

Khella contains substances that seem to relax and widen blood vessels; decrease heart contraction; open up the lungs; increase "good cholesterol" (HDL, high-density lipoprotein); and fight bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

Several prescription drugs including amiodarone, nifedipine, and cromolyn have been developed from khella.

Are there safety concerns?

Khella is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken in high doses or used for a long time. It can cause side effects including liver problems, nausea, dizziness, constipation, lack of appetite, headache, itching, trouble sleeping, and skin sensitivity to sunlight (photosensitization).

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: it's LIKELY UNSAFE to take khella if you are pregnant. It contains khellin, a chemical that can cause the uterus to contract. This might cause a miscarriage.

It's also best to avoid khella if you are breast-feeding. There isn't enough information to know if it is safe for the nursing infant.

Liver disease: Khella might make liver disease worse. Don't use it if you have liver problems.


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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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