Jojoba

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What other names is Jojoba known by?

Buxus chinensis, Deernut, Goatnut, Huile de Jojoba, Jojoba Oil, Pignut, Simmondsia californica, Simmondsia chinensis.

What is Jojoba?

Jojoba is a shrub that is grows in dry regions of northern Mexico and the southwestern US. Jojoba oil and wax are produced from the seeds and used for medicine.

Jojoba is applied directly to the skin for acne, psoriasis, sunburn, and chapped skin. It is also used topically to encourage the regrowth of hair in people who are balding.

In manufacturing, jojoba is used as an ingredient in shampoo; lipstick; makeup; cleansing products; and in face, hand, and body lotions.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Alzheimer's disease. Early research suggests that massaging the hand with jojoba oil does not improve emotions, aggression, or mental function in people with Alzheimer's disease.
  • Mosquito repellant. Early research suggests that applying a specific product containing jojoba oil, coconut oil, rapeseed oil, and vitamin E (Three Bio-skincare) to the skin might be effective as a mosquito repellant, with effects lasting for at least 3 hours after application.
  • Acne.
  • Psoriasis.
  • Sunburn.
  • Chapped skin.
  • Hair loss.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of jojoba for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Jojoba work?

Jojoba, when applied to the skin, is an emollient, which soothes skin and unclogs hair follicles. There is an interest in using jojoba for balding because some people think that unclogged hair follicles are more likely to produce new hair.

Are there safety concerns?

Jojoba is LIKELY SAFE for most people when applied to the skin. It can cause some side effects such as rash and allergic reactions.

Jojoba is LIKELY UNSAFE for anyone when taken by mouth. Jojoba contains a chemical called erucic acid, which can cause serious side effects such as heart damage.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Applying jojoba to the skin during pregnancy and breast-feeding is LIKELY SAFE. But it is LIKELY UNSAFE to take jojoba by mouth.

Dosing considerations for Jojoba.

The appropriate dose of jojoba depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for jojoba. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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