Ip-6

How does Ip-6 work?

IP-6 might help treat and prevent cancer by slowing down the production of cancer cells. It might also bind to certain minerals, decreasing the risk of colon cancer. IP-6 is also an antioxidant.

Are there safety concerns?

IP-6 is safe when used in amounts found in foods. There isn't enough information to know if it is safe when used in medicinal amounts.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: IP-6 is safe for pregnant and breast-feeding women when used in food amounts. But the safety of using IP-6 is larger medicinal amounts is unknown. It's best to stick to food amounts if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Clotting disorders: Test tube studies suggest that IP-6 can slow blood clotting. Although this effect has not been shown in humans, experts recommend that people with clotting disorders avoid using IP-6.

Iron-deficiency anemia: IP-6 binds with iron in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This reduces the amount of iron that the body absorbs from food and supplements.

Weak bones (osteoporosis or osteopenia): IP-6 binds with calcium in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This reduces the amount of calcium that the body absorbs from food and supplements. Reduced calcium can affect bone strength.

Surgery: Since test tube research suggests that IP-6 might slow blood clotting, there is a concern that it might increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using IP-6 at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.


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