Inositol Nicotinate

Are there any interactions with medications?



Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Chronic use of inositol nicotinate might increase blood sugar. Diabetes medications are used to lower blood sugar. By increasing blood sugar, inositol nicotinate might decrease the effectiveness of diabetes medications. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.



Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Inositol nicotinate might slow blood clotting. Taking inositol nicotinate along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.



Medications used for lowering cholesterol (Statins)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Inositol nicotinate is changed in the body to niacin. Niacin can affect the muscles. Some medication used for lowering cholesterol can also affect the muscles. Taking niacin along with some medications used for lowering high cholesterol might increase the risk of muscle problems.

Some medications used for high cholesterol include cerivastatin (Baycol), atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), and others.



Nicotine patch (Transdermal nicotine)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Inositol nicotinate is broken down in the body to niacin. Niacin can sometimes cause flushing and dizziness. The nicotine patch can also cause flushing and dizziness. Taking inositol nicotinate and using a nicotine patch can increase the possibility of becoming flushed and dizzy.

Dosing considerations for Inositol Nicotinate.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For blood circulation problems in the legs, feet and arms: The typical dosing range is 1500-4000 mg of inositol nicotinate daily given in 2-4 divided doses.

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