Flu (Influenza)

  • Medical Author:
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Flu Slideshow: 10 Foods to Eat When You Have the Flu

Quick Guide10 Foods to Eat When You Have the Flu

10 Foods to Eat When You Have the Flu

What are flu (influenza) symptoms in adults and in children?

Typical clinical features of influenza may include

  • fever (usually 100 F-103 F in adults and often even higher in children, sometimes with facial flushing and/or sweating),
  • chills,
  • respiratory symptoms such as
    • cough (more often in adults),
    • sore throat (more often in adults),
    • runny or stuffy nose (congestion, especially in children),
  • headache,
  • muscle aches (body aches), and
  • fatigue, sometimes extreme.

Although appetite loss, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea can sometimes accompany influenza infection, especially in children, gastrointestinal symptoms are rarely prominent. The term "stomach flu" is a misnomer that is sometimes used to describe gastrointestinal illnesses caused by other microorganisms. H1N1 infections, however, caused more nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea than the conventional (seasonal) flu viruses. Depending upon the severity of the infection, some patients can develop swollen lymph nodes, muscle pain, shortness of breath, severe headaches, chest pain or chest discomfort, dehydration, and even death.

Most individuals who contract influenza recover in a week or two, however, others develop potentially life-threatening complications like pneumonia. In an average year, influenza is associated with about 36,000 deaths nationwide and many more hospitalizations. Flu-related complications can occur at any age; however, the elderly and people with chronic health problems are much more likely to develop serious complications after the conventional influenza infections than are younger, healthier people.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/28/2016

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