ibandronate, Boniva (cont.)

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PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 150 mg; Intravenous injection, 3 mg/3 ml

STORAGE: Ibandronate tablets should be stored at room temperature, 15 C - 30 C (59 F - 86 F).

DOSING: The dose of ibandronate is 150 mg orally once monthly. The tablet should be taken on the same day of each month. Tablets should be taken at least 60 minutes before the first food or drink of the day (other than plain water) or before other oral medication, because of concern that that food or medication will interfere with the absorption of ibandronate. Absorption of ibandronate from the intestine is poor, and any potential further decrease in absorption by food or medications needs to be avoided.

Ibandronate tablets also should be swallowed whole with six to eight ounces of plain water while in an upright position, in order to be certain that the tablets enter the stomach. If the tablets stick in the esophagus they can irritate the esophagus. For the same reason, patients should not lie down for 60 minutes after taking ibandronate since tablets are more likely to stick in the esophagus when lying down.

Tablets should not be chewed or sucked in order to avoid irritation of the mouth and throat.

The dose of ibandronate administered intravenously is 3 mg administered over 15-30 seconds every three months.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Calcium supplements, antacids, and other products that contain aluminum, magnesium, or iron may reduce absorption of ibandronate. Ibandronate should be administered at least 60 minutes before administration of any oral medication, including medications containing iron, aluminum, magnesium, or calcium.

Patients should wait at least 60 minutes after taking ibandronate before taking other oral medications. The occurrence of irritation in the stomach and intestines may increase if aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, Motrin, Aleve) are combined with ibandronate.

PREGNANCY: Bisphosphonates have been shown to cause fetal harm in animals, but there are no data on risk to the fetus in humans. Ibandronate should be used during pregnancy only if the physician feels that its potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/25/2015

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