Hysteroscopy

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

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Why is hysteroscopy done?

Hysteroscopy can be performed for both diagnosis or also for treatment (therapeutic). Hysteroscopy is one of several procedures that your doctor may recommend to evaluate or treat abnormalities of the uterus or cervix. Since hysteroscopy examines the lining and interior of the uterus, it is not suitable for evaluating problems within the muscular wall or on the outer surface of the uterus.

Hysteroscopy may be recommended as one step in the evaluation of a number of gynecological problems, including:

  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Retained placenta or products of conception after a birth or miscarriage
  • Congenital (inborn) anatomical abnormalities of the female genital tract
  • Scarring, or adhesions, from previous uterine surgery or instrumentation such as dilation and curettage (D&C)
  • Polyps or fibroid tumors inside the cervical canal or inside the uterine cavity

Hysteroscopy can also be used to help pinpoint the location of abnormalities in the uterine lining for sampling and biopsy. Hysteroscopy can also be used to perform surgical sterilization.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/1/2015

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