• Medical Author:

    Dr. Suzanne Trupin is a Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University Of Illinois College Of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign. She graduated from Stanford University and completed her medical training at New York Medical in Valhalla, New York. She received her residency training at the University of Southern California Women's Hospital in Los Angeles, California. She is Board-Certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Quick GuideFemale Sexual Dysfunction: Treatment for Women's Sexual Disorders

Female Sexual Dysfunction: Treatment for Women's Sexual Disorders

Laparoscopic supra cervical hysterectomy

The laparoscopic supra cervical hysterectomy procedure is performed like the LAVH procedure, but the uterus is separated from the cervix, and the uterine tissue is removed through the laparoscopic incision. Recovery is generally faster than with other types of hysterectomy. Cervical preservation is less likely to result in menses (menstruation) as the inner lining of the cervix is usually cauterized.

Radical hysterectomy

The radical hysterectomy procedure involves more extensive surgery than a total abdominal hysterectomy because it also includes removing tissues surrounding the uterus and removal of the upper vagina. Radical hysterectomy is most commonly performed for early cervical cancer. There are more complications with radical hysterectomy compared to abdominal hysterectomy. These include injury to the bowels and urinary system.

Oophorectomy and salpingoophorectomy (removal of the ovaries or Fallopian tubes)

Oophorectomy is the surgical removal of the ovary(s), while salpingoophorectomy is the removal of the ovary and its adjacent Fallopian tube. These two procedures are performed for ovarian cancer, removal of suspicious ovarian tumors, or Fallopian tube cancer (which is very rare). They may also be performed due to complications of infection, or in combination with hysterectomy for cancer. Occasionally, women with inherited types of cancer of the ovary or breast will have an oophorectomy as preventive (prophylactic) surgery in order to reduce the risk of future cancer of the ovary or breast. Current recommendations are that the fallopian tubes should be removed during hysterectomy even if the ovaries are preserved. This is done to decrease the lifetime risk of ovarian cancer, which can arise from the fallopian tubes in up to 25% of case.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/17/2016

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Women's Health Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors