Patient Comments: Hypoglycemia - Effective Treatments

What kinds of treatment help your hypoglycemia? Do you carry food (glucose) with you at all times?

Comment from: youngdude, 25-34 Male (Patient) Published: January 22

I have a son who is 33 years old and he had an episode that was frightened to the ER doctor he is not a diabetic at all but his sugar level dropped to 16 he was just sweating like a river he was nervous, shaking, hungry and the doctor did not know what was wrong with him he was put in intensive care unit never felt bad or was out of it but this lasted all day in ER he was given 100 percent glucose in his veins, we would like to understand more about this condition we need help to know is he in any kind of danger he has not seen a specialist they did many tests one they received back told them that there was tremendous amount of insulin in his body this young man does not take any kind of medication.

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Comment from: becca, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: January 22

My father, my three brothers and I are all hypoglycemic. My dad (who learned it from his dad) calls it the weak trembles. None of us have ever known what is really was until recently. It had been a long day, and I had a three hour drive in front of me and I knew that I had to eat. Hadn't eaten anything all day except for an egg with toast and I could feel the weak trembles coming on strong. I stopped to eat, I took two bites of a fast food chicken sandwich and one sip of soda and my body freaked out. Long story short I ended up calling an ambulance and spent several hours in the hospital. I couldn't breathe and thought I was having a heart attack (I am a healthy 27). So humiliating to find why I went in. At Thanksgiving the family talked and I thought I would share our collective knowledge here no bread (ever!), before a physically demanding day eat fruit or something high in protein no pancakes, or waffles, or biscuits, etc. Peanut butter, honey, candy bars, ice cream are great immediate cures for the shakes during the day. Lay down if at all possible when the shakes come on. For me, the first sign that I need to eat is a cold sweat.

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Comment from: 75 or over Male (Caregiver) Published: October 06

I am a physician with type II diabetes, age 84, and still work 12 hours five days a week. My diabetes is controlled with Amaryl and diet. I occasionally awaken with sweating, shaking, weakness and feel totally drained. I used orange juice, fruits, such as watermelon, and oranges, and other high sugar containing foods. I do feel drained for a couple of hours and then everything normalizes. I treat many diabetics, both type one and two, and have found that compliance with diet, medications, and exercise with weight control works wonderfully and gives protection to eyes, kidneys, and extremities against the devastating consequences damages to these organs without hyperglycemia.

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Comment from: gilmanheather, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: October 06

I first started having hypoglycemic symptoms when I was about 11 years old. I am now 30 years old. I would get really bad headaches, become shaky, moody, and tired if I waited too long to eat or if I had candy. My mom noticed it and took me to the doctor. They had me tested for hypoglycemia and said I had low blood sugar and to eat proteins. That's all. I have had to learn on my own how to eat. I have never checked my blood sugar and I need to start. I sometimes get headaches daily that will last all day due to not eating when I need to. I carry snacks with me and eat sometimes when I am not even hungry just because I can feel my sugar dropping. I know it is dropping because of the pattern I have seen over the years. I never knew there might be medicine I can take to help.

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Comment from: Grannygail54, 19-24 Female (Caregiver) Published: August 21

I am a mother of a 19-year-old daughter who has had hypoglycemia since she was 13. When she was diagnosed, she was sick, had headaches, stomach aches, was dizzy, and was shaking all over. I would be called to her school about three times a week. Finally, after several appointments with our family doctor, he sent my daughter to a diabetes specialist, and she was tested and that was it. She was given Precose, a medication that is given for diabetes but also works to keep the sugar lever at a balance for my daughter. It works. There are still some days when it is bad. She is in college, working and keeping very busy, but Precose is a great treatment. The doctor checks her once a year now for diabetes because we have several family members who have diabetes.

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Comment from: cndrs, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: November 07

I am a 53 year old woman who has been hypoglycemic for many years. I've read everything I can about it and realize there are many different theories on how to control it. I work in the restaurant business and sometimes I'm too busy to eat when I should. I've experimented with lots of different foods and have found that peanut butter works better than anything else. Pasta is another food that seems to keep me on an even keel for longer. The good thing about peanut butter is that 2 tablespoons will keep me feeling good for several hours. It's a quick fix when you don't have time to eat. I don't like peanut butter but it works better than anything else I've tried.

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Hypoglycemia - Symptoms Question: What were the symptoms and signs of your hypoglycemia?
Hypoglycemia - Risk Factors Question: Please describe your risk factors, like pre-diabetes, for hypoglycemia.

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