Hypermobility Syndrome (Joint Hypermobility Syndrome)

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

  • Medical Editor: Catherine Burt Driver, MD
    Catherine Burt Driver, MD

    Catherine Burt Driver, MD

    Catherine Burt Driver, MD, is board certified in internal medicine and rheumatology by the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Driver is a member of the American College of Rheumatology. She currently is in active practice in the field of rheumatology in Mission Viejo, Calif., where she is a partner in Mission Internal Medical Group.

Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

What is the treatment for hypermobility syndrome?

Often joint hypermobility causes no symptoms and requires no treatment. Many individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome improve in adulthood. Treatments are customized for each individual based on their particular manifestations. Joint pains can be relieved by medications for pain or inflammation. Proper physical fitness exercise should be designed to avoid injury to joints. Home remedies include home exercises and acetaminophen (Tylenol), as needed. Sometimes physical therapy can help with rehabilitation of injured areas and can be especially helpful to prevent reinjury.

What types of doctors treat hypermobility syndrome?

Doctors who treat hypermobility syndrome include general-medicine doctors, family medicine doctors, and internists, as well as rheumatologists, orthopedists, and physical-medicine physicians.

Is it possible to prevent joint hypermobility syndrome?

Because joint hypermobility syndrome is inherited, it is not preventable. Nevertheless, when joint hypermobility syndrome causes symptoms, prevention of injury and pain is possible by avoiding trauma and with appropriate treatments.

What is the prognosis for those affected by joint hypermobility syndrome?

Frequently, there are no long-term consequences of joint hypermobility syndrome. However, hypermobile joints can lead to joint pain. Over time, joint hypermobility can lead to degenerative cartilage and arthritis. Certain hypermobile joints can be at risk for injury, such sprained ligaments.

REFERENCE:

Klippel, J.H., et al. Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases. New York: Springer, 2008.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/12/2016

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