hyoscyamine sublingual (Levbid, Levsin, Nulev, Anaspaz)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

PREPARATIONS:

  • Capsules or tablet Extended Release: 0.375 mg.
  • Elixir: 0.125 mg/5 ml.
  • Injections: 0.5 mg/ml.
  • Oral Drops: 0.125 mg/ml.
  • Tablet: 0.125 mg

STORAGE:

  • Hyoscyamine should be stored at room temperature between 20 C and 25 C (68 F and 77 F).

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM:

  • Hyoscyamine is an anticholinergic drug used for treating irritable bowel syndrome, peptic ulcer disease, hypermotility of the lower urinary tract, and gastrointestinal disorders. Anticholinergics work by blocking the action of acetylcholine in the brain and at nerves throughout the body. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter. Neurotransmitters are chemicals made and released by nerves that travel to nearby nerves or, in the case of acetylcholine, nearby muscles and glands where they attach to receptors on the surface of the nerve, muscle or glandular cells. The attachment of the neurotransmitter can stimulate or inhibit the activity of the receptor-containing cells. Anticholinergic drugs like hyoscyamine affect the function of many organs by preventing acetylcholine from binding to its receptors. Hyoscyamine decreases the activity of muscles in the intestine and lower urinary tract. It reduces the production of sweat, saliva, digestive juices, urine, and tears. It also reduces the production of bronchial secretions.

REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/23/2016

Quick GuideIBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, Treatment

IBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, Treatment
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