hydrocortisone rectal foam (Cortifoam, Anusol-HC, Anucort-HC)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Eni Williams, PharmD, PhD

    Dr. Eni Williams graduated from Creighton University in 1988 with a B.S. degree in pharmacy and a Doctor of Pharmacy from Howard University in 1994. She also obtained a Ph.D. in Public Policy in 2009 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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DOSING: For proctitis the usual dosage is one suppository applied in the morning and night time. Severe cases may require application 3 times daily or 2 suppositories twice daily. One enema is applied at bedtime for 21 days or until symptoms resolve. The dosing for foam is one applicator once daily or every 12 hours for 2-3 weeks, then every other day if necessary.

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Hydrocortisone is a natural corticosteroid produced by the adrenal glands that are located adjacent to the kidneys. Corticosteroids have potent anti-inflammatory properties and are used in a wide variety of inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. There are numerous preparations of corticosteroids including oral tablets, capsules, liquids, topical creams and gels, inhalers and eye drops, as well as injectable and intravenous solutions. Hydrocortisone that is used for rectal conditions is discussed in this article. The FDA approved hydrocortisone in December 1952.

Medically reviewed by Eni Williams, PharmD

REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/3/2016
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