hydrocortisone rectal foam (Cortifoam, Anusol-HC, Anucort-HC)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Eni Williams, PharmD, PhD

    Dr. Eni Williams graduated from Creighton University in 1988 with a B.S. degree in pharmacy and a Doctor of Pharmacy from Howard University in 1994. She also obtained a Ph.D. in Public Policy in 2009 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Hemorrhoids Slideshow Pictures

GENERIC NAME: hydrocortisone rectal foam

BRAND NAMES: Cortifoam, Anusol-HC, Anucort-HC, Proctocort, Colocort, Cortenema, Hemmorex-HC

DISCONTINUED BRAND: Rectacort-HC

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

USES: Hydrocortisone is used rectally for the treatment of ulcerative proctitis, inflamed hemorrhoids, and anal itching, burning, and inflammation caused by several conditions that affect the anal area.

SIDE EFFECTS: Hydrocortisone's most common side effects when applied to the rectum include:

Other side effects include:

  • local pain and
  • rectal bleeding

PREPARATIONS: Enema: 100 mg/60 ml; Foam: 10% (15 g); Suppository: 25 and 30 mg

STORAGE: Hydrocortisone should be store at room temperature, 20 C to 25 C (68 F to 77 F), in a sealed container.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: The risk of drug interactions is low when hydrocortisone is administered rectally.

PREGNANCY AND BREASTFEEDING INFORMATION: Hydrocortisone has not been adequately evaluated during pregnancy. Hydrocortisone taken orally can appear in breast milk, and can have adverse effects on the baby. It is not known whether hydrocortisone administered rectally is absorbed in sufficient amounts to appear in breast milk.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/3/2016
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