Horseradish

What other names is Horseradish known by?

Amoraciae Rusticanae Radix, Armoracia lopathifolia, Armoracia rusticana, Cochlearia armoracia, Cran de Bretagne, Cranson, Grand Raifort, Great Raifort, Meerrettich, Mountain Radish, Moutarde des Allemands, Moutarde des Capucins, Moutardelle, Nasturtium armoracia, Pepperrot, Rábano Picante, Rábano Rústico, Radis de Cheval, Raifort, Raifort Sauvage, Red Cole, Rorippa armoracia.

What is Horseradish?

Horseradish is a plant. It is frequently prepared as a condiment, but the roots are also used as medicine.

Horseradish is used for urinary tract infections, kidney stones, fluid retention, cough, bronchitis, achy joints (rheumatism), gallbladder disorders, sciatic nerve pain, gout, colic, and intestinal worms in children.

Some people apply horseradish directly to the skin for painful and swollen joints or tissues and for minor muscle aches.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Bronchitis. Early research shows that taking a specific product (Angocin Anti-Infekt N) containing horseradish root and nasturtium by mouth for about 7-14 days reduces symptoms of acute bronchitis as effectively as antibiotics.
  • Nasal swelling (sinusitis). Early research shows that taking a specific product (Angocin Anti-Infekt N) containing horseradish root and nasturtium by mouth for about 7-14 days reduces symptoms of acute sinusitis as effectively as antibiotics.
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs). Early research shows that taking a specific product (Angocin Anti-Infekt N) containing horseradish root and nasturtium by mouth for about 7-14 days is less effective than antibiotics for reducing symptoms of UTIs.
  • Fluid retention (edema).
  • Cough.
  • Achy joints and muscles.
  • Gout.
  • Gallbladder disorders.
  • Sciatic nerve pain.
  • Colic.
  • Intestinal worms.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of horseradish for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


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