hepatitis A and hepatitis B (recombinant) vaccine (Twinrix) (cont.)

Pharmacy Author:
Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

DOSING:

Adults of 18 years of age or older:

  • Standard dosing: Standard dosing schedule consists of 3 doses of 1 ml each. Administer 1 ml, intramuscularly on deltoid muscle, at 0, 1, and 6 months.
  • Accelerated dosing: Accelerated dosing schedule consists 4 doses of 1 ml each. Administer 1 ml intramuscularly into the deltoid muscle on days 0, 7, and 21 to 30, followed by a 4th dose at month 12.

Safe and effective use of hepatitis A/B vaccine in patients younger than 18 years of age has not been established.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Hepatitis A/B vaccine vaccines should not be used with medications and therapies that suppress the immune system such as adalimumab (Humira), belimumab (Benlysta), cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune), azathioprine (Imuran), irradiation, and high doses of steroids because suppressing the immune system reduces the effectiveness of hepatitis A/B vaccine.

PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies done on hepatitis A/B vaccine to determine safe and effective use in pregnant women. Hepatitis A/B vaccine should be given to pregnant women only if clearly needed.

NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known whether hepatitis A/B vaccine enters breast milk; therefore, it is best to be cautious before using it in mothers who are breastfeeding.

SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of hepatitis A/B vaccine are injection site soreness and pain, headache, fatigue, redness, diarrhea, nausea, and fainting. The tip caps of pre-filled syringes may contain latex which can cause allergic reactions in latex-sensitive people. Serious allergic reactions, abnormal heart beats, and hair loss have also been reported.

REFERENCE:FDA Prescribing Information.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/20/2014


Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Pill Finder Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.


Back to Medications Index