Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP) or Anaphylactoid Purpura

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

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What is the treatment for HSP?

While HSP is generally a mild illness that resolves spontaneously, it can cause serious problems in the kidneys and bowels. The rash can be very prominent, especially on the lower extremities.

The treatment of HSP is directed toward the most significant area of involvement. Joint pain can be relieved by anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen (Motrin). Some patients can require cortisone medications, such as prednisone or prednisolone, especially those with significant abdominal pain or kidney disease. With more severe kidney disease, involvement called glomerulonephritis or nephritis, cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), azathioprine (Imuran), or mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) have been used to suppress the immune system. Infection, if present, can require antibiotics.

What are complications of HSP?

HSP can have complications, which generally occur more frequently in children than in adults. These complications include severe abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. Adults can have extended kidney problems.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/7/2016
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