Hematoma

  • Medical Author:
    Benjamin Wedro, MD, FACEP, FAAEM

    Dr. Ben Wedro practices emergency medicine at Gundersen Clinic, a regional trauma center in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His background includes undergraduate and medical studies at the University of Alberta, a Family Practice internship at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

  • Medical Editor: Mary D. Nettleman, MD, MS, MACP
    Mary D. Nettleman, MD, MS, MACP

    Mary D. Nettleman, MD, MS, MACP

    Mary D. Nettleman, MD, MS, MACP is the Chair of the Department of Medicine at Michigan State University. She is a graduate of Vanderbilt Medical School, and completed her residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Indiana University.

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What conditions cause a hematoma?

Conditions that cause a hematoma include:

  • Aneurysm
  • Medications: Blood thinners or anticoagulation medications, including warfarin (Coumadin), aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), prasugrel (Effient), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and apixaban (Eliquis) may increase the potential for spontaneous bleeding and for hematomas to expand because the body cannot efficiently repair blood vessels. This allows blood to continually leak through the damaged areas.
  • Diseases or conditions that may decrease the number of platelets in the bloodstream (thrombocytopenia) or diminish their function: Viral infections (rubella, parvovirus, mumps, chickenpox, HIV, and hepatitis C), aplastic anemia, cancers from other organs, long-term alcohol abuse, and vitamin D deficiency may be associated with hematomas.
  • Orthopedic injuries: Fractures are always associated with hematomas at the fracture site. Fractures of long bones such as the thigh (femur) and upper arm (humerus) can be associated with a significant amount of bleeding. Continue Reading
Reviewed on 9/17/2015
References
REFERENCE:

Longo, Dan, et al. Harrisons's Principles of Internal Medicine. 18th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2011.

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