Heat Rash

  • Medical Author:
    Benjamin Wedro, MD, FACEP, FAAEM

    Dr. Ben Wedro practices emergency medicine at Gundersen Clinic, a regional trauma center in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His background includes undergraduate and medical studies at the University of Alberta, a Family Practice internship at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

  • Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Quick GuideHeat Rash Pictures, Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments

Heat Rash Pictures, Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments

How can people protect their health when temperatures are extremely high?

The body can adapt very well in hot weather, but it takes time to acclimate. The actual temperature is just one factor when a person decides to work, play, or exercise in the heat. The heat index adds humidity to the equation since sweat cannot evaporate if the water content in the air (humidity) is high. If the air holds as much water as it can there is no place for sweat to go, and evaporation cannot cool the body.

To minimize the risk of  heat-related illnesses, try to avoid working or exercising in extreme heat. Avoid dehydration and other complications by taking frequent breaks to get out of the heat, and drinking plenty of water or other fluids to replenish fluid lost through sweat.

Early signs of heat-related illnesses include lightheadedness,weakness, and nausea. It is important to get out of the heat, cool off, and rehydrate immediately to avoid severe heat-related problems such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

To calculate the heat index in your area, check out theU.S. Army's Heat Index Calculator. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 11/3/2015
References
Medically reviewed by Norman Levine, MD; American Board of Dermatology

REFERENCES:

Rakel R. Textbook of Family Medicine. 8th edition. Philadelphia: Saunders/Elsevier. 2011

WebMD.com. Heat Rash Overview.

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