Heart Failure

  • Medical Author:
    Erica Oberg, ND, MPH

    Dr. Erica Oberg, ND, MPH, received a BA in anthropology from the University of Colorado, her doctorate of naturopathic medicine (ND) from Bastyr University, and a masters of public health (MPH) in health services research from the University of Washington. She completed her residency at the Bastyr Center for Natural Health in ambulatory primary care and fellowship training at the Health Promotion Research Center at the University of Washington.

  • Medical Author: Mimi Guarneri, MD, FACC, ABIHM
    Mimi Guarneri, MD, FACC, ABIHM

    Dr. Mimi Guarneri, MD, FACC, ABIHM, is board certified in cardiovascular disease, internal medicine, nuclear medicine, and holistic medicine. Dr. Guarneri is president of the American Board of Integrative Holistic Medicine and serves as Senior Advisor to the Atlantic Health System for the Center for Well Being and Integrative Medicine. Dr. Guarneri is founder and director of Guarneri Integrative Health, Inc. and Taylor Academy for Integrative Medicine Education and Research located at Pacific Pearl La Jolla in La Jolla, CA.

  • Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

Quick GuideHeart Disease: Causes of a Heart Attack

Heart Disease: Causes of a Heart Attack

What is the treatment for heart failure?

Heart failure treatment options include making healthier decisions about lifestyle and diet, taking medications, and sometimes implanting devices. Heart transplant is sometimes considered for certain individuals.

In acute or decompensated heart failure, the person may need hospitalization or even intravenous medications to help recover.

What diet and lifestyle management techniques helps heart failure?

Many lifestyle and diet factors can improve, or even reverse, congestive heart failure. Cardiac rehabilitation programs can teach people how to make lifestyle changes, as can integrative cardiology clinics. Some of the lifestyle factors that make a difference include:

  • Manage stress by doing mind-body practices such as Tai Chi, yoga, Qi Gong, and meditation
  • Quit smoking or using tobacco
  • Eliminate alcohol
  • Eat a healthy Mediterranean, vegetarian, or vegan diet
  • Be physically active and become stronger
  • Get enough restful sleep
  • Manage and treat sleep apnea
  • Take dietary supplements including CoQ10, L-carnitine, Crataegus (hawthorne), magnesium, and fish oil
  • Avoiding salt and excess fluids

Talk to your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/22/2016

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