How to Prevent a Heart Attack

  • Medical Author:
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

View the Heart Disease Slideshow

Quick GuideHeart-Healthy Foods Pictures Slideshow: 25 Foods to Protect Your Cardiovascular System

Heart-Healthy Foods Pictures Slideshow: 25 Foods to Protect Your Cardiovascular System

What are the signs and symptoms of a heart attack in men and women?

Symptoms of a heart attack include:

  • Chest discomfort or pain that may feel like pressure
  • Squeezing, or fullness discomfort in one or both arms
  • Back, neck, jaw or stomach pain
  • Shortness of breath, which may or may not be accompanied by chest discomfort
  • Nausea
  • Palpitations
  • Lightheadedness
  • Sweating

Sometimes people having a heart attack experience no symptoms at all. The medical term for this is silent ischemia, commonly referred to as a "silent" heart attack.

If you think you are experiencing signs of a heart attack, call 911 immediately!

Are signs and symptoms of a heart attack different in women?

Women also experience chest pain and discomfort as a symptom of a heart attack. But women are more likely than men to experience other symptoms including shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, and back or jaw pain. Sometimes the symptoms of a heart attack in women are more subtle, such as

If you think you are experiencing signs of a heart attack, call 911 immediately!

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/29/2016
VIEW PATIENT COMMENTS
  • Heart Attack Prevention - Diet Tips

    What healthy diet tips (what foods have you eliminated, what foods you now include, etc.,) have you found to be useful in reducing your risk of heart attack, or another one?

    Post

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors