Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

  • Medical Author:

    Robert Ferry Jr., MD, is a U.S. board-certified Pediatric Endocrinologist. After taking his baccalaureate degree from Yale College, receiving his doctoral degree and residency training in pediatrics at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), he completed fellowship training in pediatric endocrinology at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

View the Hyperthyroidism Slideshow Pictures

Quick GuideThyroid Problems Explained

Thyroid Problems Explained

How is Hashimoto's thyroiditis diagnosed?

TTo diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a physician should assess symptoms and complaints commonly seen in hypothyroidism, carefully examine the neck to look for enlargement of the thyroid gland, and take a detailed history of family members. Blood tests are essential to diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Specific blood tests determine the level of thyroid function.

During the early stage of thyroiditis, the levels of thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) may be normal. With chronic hypothyroidism, the thyroid hormone levels fall, and the level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) becomes high. The most useful assay for determining thyroid status is measurement of TSH in the blood. As mentioned earlier, TSH is secreted by the pituitary gland. As the level of thyroid hormone falls, the pituitary gland responds by releasing more thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The increase in TSH can actually precede the fall of thyroid hormone to low levels by months or years, so the first sign of hypothyroidism may be an elevated TSH level even when levels of thyroid hormones are normal.

The blood work mentioned above confirms the diagnosis of hypothyroidism, but does not point to an underlying cause. The combination of the patient's clinical history, antibody screening (as mentioned above), and a thyroid scan can help diagnose the precise underlying thyroid problem. If a pituitary or hypothalamic cause is suspected, MRI of the brain and other studies may be warranted. These investigations should be made on a case-by-case basis.

Illustration of the Pituitary Gland
Illustration of the Pituitary Gland

The blood tests also usually include an analysis of antibodies (anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies) to aid diagnosis. If the anti-TPO antibodies are elevated at all, the diagnosis is made. Early on in the course of the disease, however, the patient may have negative antibodies.

If the gland is large, or there are symptoms of esophageal compression, an ultrasound may be performed to see if the gland is compressing either the esophagus (the food tube) or the trachea (the airway).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/3/2015

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