Hamstring Injuries

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

  • Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

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How do health-care professionals diagnose hamstring injuries?

Injury to the hamstring muscle is diagnosed by the rapid onset of intense pain in the back of the mid-thigh during running or similar activity. Athletes will often instantly grab in pain at the back of the thigh, being unable to walk without limping. There is often focal tenderness where there is pain that is aggravated by stretching the affected thigh. In most patients, imaging is not necessary. However, if imaging is done to more completely view the muscle, tendon, or bone involvement with the injury, MRI gives the best views, although CT and ultrasound studies have also been used.

What are home remedies for hamstring injury?

The goal of treatment is to restore muscle function and prevent scar formation. Initially, treatment consists of rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). Rest refers to avoidance of offending activities and oftentimes includes immobilization. In severe cases, crutches or splinting may be necessary. Ice, compression, and elevation all help in controlling pain and swelling. A short course of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Children's Advil/Motrin, Medipren, Motrin, Nuprin, PediaCare Fever, and others), or naproxen (Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn, Aleve), may be helpful (avoid aspirin use in children).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/26/2016

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